6 Useful Benefits Your Preschooler Realizes by Playing Alone

BarbChild Development, Parenting

benefits-your-preschooler-realizes-by-playing-alone

 

Do you sometimes wish your child would not depend upon you so much to be his playmate?  Are there actually benefits your preschooler realizes by playing alone? How can you encourage your little one to play more inedependently?

Benefits Your Preschooler Realizes by Playing Alone

He learns how to manage his time.

Managing time is a skill he will need throughout his life so there is no better time to start learning how to do so. Playing alone can teach a child to play within a time period to build a castle, read a book, or complete a drawing.

He learns how to make his own fun.

Your child can’t grow up expecting you or someone else to help him have fun. He has to use his creative energies to entertain himself and discover fun activities he can do himself.

He realizes that not every moment is a party.

Your preschooler learns that certain times in life can be lonely and that life can’t always be a thrill and he has to adapt accordingly.  Learning this helps him appreciate the exciting times even more after spending time alone.

He learns to problem-solve on his own.

Playing alone presents the opportunity to find solutions on his own without always turning to you or someone else for the answer. This is a powerful skill he’ll need throughout his life.

He discovers the importance of giving others their space.

Encouraging your child to play alone at times helps him learn that people will not always be available to accommodate him. They may need their own space to recuperate.

He feels a calmness.

When playing with others, your preschooler gets lots of active interaction. When playing alone, your child develops calm and self-soothing feelings.  As a result, he’ll feel less abandoned when you drop him of at school for the first time and will be able to cope better on his own.

How to Encourage Your Preschooler to Play Alone

Playing alone does not happen overnight; it will take some time for your child to develop this skill. If your child does not want to play alone, there are things you can do to foster it.

  1. Fill a basket with a few special toys, a book, safe egg beater, feather duster, whisk broom, hat, scarves and other drees-up accessories, crayons, paper, and an empty egg carton.
  2. Examine the items with your child. Gradually start becoming less involved as he shows continued interest with his basket of fun.
  3. Don’t leave the room. Rather, start your own activity whether it’s folding laundry or reading a book. From time to time, offer some praise about the manner in which your child is playing. This will give him the attention he is craving while you won’t be actively participating.
  4. Every day, add a few more minutes of this independent play until it becomes a normal routine for him.

Takeaway

There are many benefits your preschooler realizes by playing alone that will serve him well in life. Playing independently fosters creativity, time-management, calmness, and problem-solving skills. It also gives him perspective on others’ need for space. You‘ll need to encourage his ability to play alone since it does take children some time to develop this skill.


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

 

Barb6 Useful Benefits Your Preschooler Realizes by Playing Alone

11 Helpful Tips to Transition Your Preschooler from the Weekend to Monday Morning

BarbPreschool Behavior, Toddler Behavior

transition-your-preschooler-from -the-weekend-to-Monday-morning

 

 

As you drive away to work after dropping off Tammy, your three-year old, you are feeling very guilty. Tommy had spent a lot of time with you and your spouse this weekend and was not happy about going to preschool on Monday morning. She cried and kicked as you placed her in the car. You are tired of this fight every week.  What can you do to transition your preschooler from the weekend to Monday morning?

Ways to Transition Your Preschooler from the Weekend to Monday Morning

  1. Remember that the school day starts the night before. Lay out your child’s clothes the night before and plan a good breakfast. Being prepared for the next day helps kids feel in control. If you are rushing around in the morning, you are setting your child up for being upset.
  2. Promote stability. Don’t introduce something new to your regular routine. Establish regular early bedtimes so your child is well rested upon awakening. Tired children don’t have the ability to cope with goodbyes let alone the rigors of the school day.
  3. Don’t sneak out of the classroom when dropping your child off to school.  Assure your child that you will be back to pick her up at the end of the school day. Use a goodbye routine you have practiced at home with your child. If your child is continuously upset when you leave, ask the teacher if there is a special job she can assign to distract her from your departure.
  4. Avoid promising your child something you can’t accomplish. “I’ll be sitting on the bench right outside your classroom door.”
  5. Don’t emphasize your child’s negative feelings by saying, “I know you hate school.” You might say, “I hear you saying you feel sad.”
  6. Remind your child how well she tolerates new surroundings. “Remember how afraid you were of the zoo?  Now you can’t wait to go there. You are going to feel the same way about school.”
  7. Let your child bring something from home to school such as a family photo, or small stuffed animal so she doesn’t feel totally isolated from home.
  8. Eliminate your guilt of leaving your child. You may be confiding it to your child which doesn’t improve the situation. Your child will stop crying a lot sooner.
  9. If possible, ensure that you are on time or a few minutes early to pick up your child at the end of the school day. This will prevent worsening the situation.
  10. See if you can arrange a play date with another child in your child’s classroom so she becomes more familiar with her which should acclimate her better to the classroom.
  11. Consider reading a book to your child about going to preschool such as When My Mommy and Daddy Leave Me at Daycare by C. Couchois so she can identify with the characters in the book and feel less intimidated when you leave her.

We hope these suggestions to transition your preschooler from the weekend to Monday morning make life easier for you and your little one. Once your child gets into the routine of her school day, her fears should subside.


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

Barb11 Helpful Tips to Transition Your Preschooler from the Weekend to Monday Morning

Could “The Eensy-Weensy Spider” Stop Child Thumb Sucking?

BarbBaby Behavior, Preschool Behavior, Toddler Behavior

stop-child-thumb-sucking

 

Ann picked her four-year old son Dan up from preschool one rainy day.  She knew he was tired because upon entering the car he started sucking his thumb. Patiently, she motioned to him to stop.  Immediately, Dan removed his wet thumb from his mouth as Ann continued driving. Five minutes later Ann could see Dan sucking his thumb again in her rearview mirror. “It’s hopeless,” she thought.

Is Child Thumb Sucking an Issue or a Natural Occurrence?

Children actually start thumb sucking before they are born because babies have natural sucking reflexes.  You may have even see your newborn infant enjoying his thumb within two hours of his birth! This behavior makes him feel secure and can become a habit when he needs soothing or is tired.

How Long Will Your Child Suck His Thumb?

Children who suck their thumbs as babies usually stop when they are toddlers – between the ages of two and four. However, some children still suck their thumbs after the preschool years. Eventually, peer pressure ends it.  Keep in mind, that a child who has stopped thumb sucking may resume it if he gets stressed or anxious.

What Should You Do About Your Child’s Thumb Sucking?

Thumb sucking is a normal behavior for infants and young children.  According to the American There is usually no risk of damage to his teeth if he stops at age 5 before his permanent front teeth start erupting.  If your child is still sucking his thumb past this point, he could incur bite problems, protruding front teeth, sore thumbs, infections, and callouses on the thumbs. In fact, a pacifier may be a better option because it is softer and causes less damage to the teeth. Besides, you can clean it.

If your young child’s thumb sucking is affecting his daily activities, becomes embarrassing, or causes harm, it could be time to break this habit.

How to Stop Child Thumb Sucking

Sometimes a gentle reminder coupled with a reason to stop, could reinforce the message. Using pictures that explain what can happen as a result often help young children understand the consequences better.

“Dan, please stop sucking your thumb. You are putting germs in your mouth which could make you sick and I don’t want that to happen to you.”

Persuade your child to play with a toy that has moveable parts to keep his fingers out of his mouth. He could also engage in a hand game like “The Eeensy-Weensy Spider”. Lots of times, thumb sucking occurs with hair pulling or curling.  If you can stop the thumb sucking, the other behavior should go away, too. Don’t neglect praising your child when he is not sucking his thumb. “I can understand you so much better when you don’t have your fingers in your mouth.”  In addition to praising you child, you may want to set up a reward system to recognize his efforts to stop sucking his thumb.  For instance, when he doesn’t suck his thumb for two days, he gets to do a special activity he loves doing.

Your pharmacist may be able to recommend a safe solution you can paint on your child’s thumb to make it less appealing to suck. If your child is having an especially difficult time stopping thumb sucking, ask your dentist about using a palate barrier for a few weeks. This device makes it uncomfortable for children to suck their thumbs and has been successful in eliminating this habit in some children. Last but not least, if you think there may be an underlying psychological reason for your preschooler’s repetitive thumb sucking, get a referral for professional help from your pediatrician. In most cases, it’s not an issue for children under the age of 5.

Takeaway

There are a number of ways to stop child thumb sucking when it becomes an issue. Gentle reminders that stress the harm the behavior can cause and keeping your child’s hands busy to distract him from doing so are starting points. Praising and rewarding your child for his efforts to eliminate this habit should be considered, too.  If all else fails, you may need to consider professional help from your pharmacist, dentist, or a psychologist.  Most experts agree that thumb sucking behavior in children under the age of 5 is not a worrisome problem but rather a natural occurrence.


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

BarbCould “The Eensy-Weensy Spider” Stop Child Thumb Sucking?

Novel Ways to Read Aloud to Your Young Child

BarbBaby Behavior, Child Development, Toddler Behavior

read-aloud-to-your-young-child

 

Did you know that when you read aloud to your young child well before his first birthday, you can help boost his language skills and increase his eagerness to learn how to read? In fact, it helps strengthen the bonding process between you and your child because you have his full attention. There are no toys or television to distract him.

When Should You Start to Read Aloud to Your Young  Child?

Research shows that you should start reading to your baby from birth because it acclimates your child to the sounds and rhythms of speech which are important to his language development.

How to Read Aloud to Your Young Child

Birth – 12 Months

During this time period, you want to select books with little or no text but large high-contrast images since your baby’s vision is still developing. Make the reading experience as enjoyable as possible by selecting interactive books which have such things as puppets, mirrors, or peepholes. Reading to your baby is not about having him understand the words but rather about the tone of your voice and cuddling up to you.

7-12 Months

According to Crosby Rogers, PhD, a professor of human development at Virginia Polytech Institute, babies at this stage may start to understand some of the words you read to them. Obviously, the words that mean the most to them are things from their everyday experiences like, “doggy”, “kitty” “mommy”, “daddy”, “milk”, or “bottle”.

Point to the pictures your child favors and act out with your voice, hand and face gestures. Put a name to each object to reinforce your child’s vocabulary and help him comprehend that images represent real things.  Use books with just one object or person per page. Likewise, It’s best to use board books which can tolerate rough handling and chewing. Using them makes it easier for your child to turn the pages.

13- 24 Months

This is the time to introduce books with one or two sentences per page. Continue to act out what’s happening with your voice and gestures. For instance, if you are reading about animals, make animal sounds such as “quack quack”, “moo”, or “baa”.  Your baby will enjoy this and will soon start mimicking these sounds back to you.

When reading a story to your child, get him more involved by asking questions such as, “What does the kitty say?” or “Where is the dog?” Start incorporating more pictures of things your baby doesn’t see every day. Between 15 to 18 months, your baby may be able to answer questions about the book with one-word answers. You might ask, “What’s that?”  If your child answers, “Car”, you can expand her vocabulary by acknowledging, “Yes, that’s a big red car.”

19-24 Months

If you ‘ve established a routine of reading daily to your toddler, he will find the experience reassuring and calming.  In fact, at 18 months, he’ll probably be asking for the same book continuously. He’ll most likely want you to use the same words to describe sounds such as “meow”, “woof-woof”, “oink-oink”. Experts believe this repetition helps children distinguish and then remember new words.

Takeaway

When you read aloud to your young child, you foster a lifelong love of books. It helps her see the connection between words spoken and written. Experts agree that reading aloud is the single most important activity for building knowledge required for success in reading. Dedicate some time each day to read aloud to give your toddler, baby, or preschooler a great foundation for his language skills.

Suggested Reading:

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

The Pout-Pout Fish Book

 We’re Going on a Bear Hunt

Green Eggs and Ham

Freight Train

Suggested Resource Article:

Building Baby’s First Library – 25 Must-Have Books

 


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

BarbNovel Ways to Read Aloud to Your Young Child

An Amazing Little-Known Key to Handling Sibling Rivalry

BarbChild Development, Parenting, Preschool Behavior, Toddler Behavior

handling-sibling-rivalry

 

Jane had stepped outside for just a few minutes to get the mail. When she returned, she heard her three-year old, Susie sobbing heavily in the hallway.

As soon as she saw her mom, Susie bellowed, “Erin won’t let me play in her room. She says she wants to play by herself. She closed her bedroom door in my face!”

This is common behavior between siblings who often see themselves as competing for attention, the TV remote, their private space, or fair treatment. How is a frustrated parent to survive?

As a parent, you need to know when to let your kids work out their differences and when to intercede. Stepping in isn’t always beneficial because it doesn’t teach your children how to resolve conflicts. It may also make you seem like you favor one child over the other especially if you are always disciplining the same child.

What’s the Cause of the Sibling Rivalry?

Different personalities

While your older child may be headstrong, your younger one may be more introverted. Those differences in temperament can eventually lead to clashes as can differences in gender and age.

Fairness

Children frequently complain about fairness and equality.  They are always watching for favoritism toward their sibling.  If a child feels he is not being treated fairly, it could lead to jealousy and resentment.

Attention

Kids will misbehave if they feel they are not getting the attention they deserve.  If you are spending more time with a new baby or a child who is sick, your other child may let you know it by acting out.

Sharing

Many times the younger child wants a toy that is a favorite of the older child.  Letting that younger sister play with that special doll can be difficult for a young child.

Handling Sibling Rivalry

In some instances, your children will be able to resolve the conflict themselves.  However, if you need to step in, here are some strategies to use to settle their differences.

Separate them.

Send each child to his room to calm down in his own space. At times, all kids need is a little distance and time away from each other to return to normal.

Teach them how to negotiate and compromise.

Get them to stop yelling and start talking to each other.  Hear each side of the story and don’t be judgmental.  Attempt to clarify the issue (It seems like you are upset because Don took your favorite stuffed animal.) Ask them to come up with a solution that will make everyone happy. If they can’t resolve it, you propose one. (Why don’t you let Tommy play with your toy for five minutes?  He’ll then give it back to you.)

Impose the rules.

Ensure all of your children are following your household rules which should include no name-calling, hitting, or destroying other’s property. Furthermore, let your kids have some input into how the rules are established and enforced. This will make them feel that they have some part in the decision-making process and a little control in their own lives.  Offer praise when your kids follow the rules.

Don’t play favorites.

Don’t ever compare your children (“Why can’t you be more like Susie?”) This will fuel the resentment between your two children and hurt the relationship between you and them.

Treat each child as special and unique.

There will never be total equality in a family. Older children will be allowed to do some things younger ones aren’t ready to experience.

Hold family meetings.

If you are experiencing compatibility issues between your children, have a weekly meeting to discuss any issues.  Let each family member express his issues and then come up with solutions together.

Spend time alone with each child.

Schedule some one-on-one time with each child.  Do something that child enjoys doing – go to a movie, go shopping, or eat at a favorite restaurant. Just 10 to 15 minutes of your attention can make your child feel good.

Takeaway

The key to handling sibling rivalry is to know when to let your kids work out their own problems and when to step in.  Practicing the strategies for handling sibling rivalry will enable them to do so.

 


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

BarbAn Amazing Little-Known Key to Handling Sibling Rivalry

Molding the Amazing History of Play-Doh

BarbChild Development

history -of-Playdoh

Chances are, you probably have a can of Play-Doh sitting in your child’s toy chest. This famous modeling clay has provided hours of learning and entertainment for children for many years since 1956.  Do you remember playing with it?  Because September 16th is National Play-Doh Day, we thought we would share the fascinating history of Play-Doh in today’s post.

The Amazing History of Play-Doh

 

Play-Doh actually got its start as a wallpaper-cleaner made by a Cincinnati – based soap company called Kutol. Back in the 1930’s, coal was the prominent source of heat.  Homeowners who had paper wallpaper were searching for a way to keep their wall coverings clean. During this time period, Kutol’s company owners, Cleo and Noah McVicker, started to see their soap company decline in business.  At a meeting with Kroger grocery chain executives, they were asked if they could make wallpaper cleaner.  Concerned about their company’s financial situation, they jumped at the chance even though they didn’t know how to make it.  After much experimentation, they produced a product that could remove the soot from the paper on the walls.

The McVicker brothers’ wallpaper cleaner kept their company afloat for ten years. After World War 2,  with the introduction of oil and gas heat as well as vinyl wallpaper, the need for their cleaner diminished.

How Did Play-Doh Become Famous?

 

In 1954, Kay Zufall, wife of one of the McVicker brothers, Bob, was running a nursery school.  She desperately needed materials that her children could use to make holiday decorations. One day while reading a magazine, she learned that you could use wallpaper cleaner to do that. She excitedly told her husband and brothers-in-law about the idea.  After successfully testing the idea, the McVicker brothers proceeded to modify their existing product by removing the detergent, and adding an almond scent and food-coloring so they could offer their product in different colors.

The McVicker brothers decided that their new modeling clay would be called Kutol’s “Rainbow Modeling Compound”. When Kay heard this, she thought the name was too long.  After much brainstorming , she finally came up with a name that would better reflect the function and content of their product. The name would be “Play-Doh”.

Initial sales were slow until one of the McVicker brothers talked his way into an interview with Bob Keeshan, Captain Kangaroo. McVicker convinced Keeshan to promote Play-Doh by featuring it once a week on his program. In turn, Keeshan would get 2% of its sales. Play-Doh soon became a national hit with soaring sales.

 

history-of-Play-Doh

 

What Are the Benefits of Playing with Play-Doh?

 

By playing with Play-Doh, your child has fun learning.  Some of the  benefits include:

Enhancing his imagination and creativity when he creates new characters  and functions  for items he makes;

Strengthening his fine motor skills as he manipulates the Play-Doh;

Developing his social skills as he learns to share when interacting with other children;

Enhancing  his  language and literacy skills as he uses words he has learned or heard in a story to describe his creations;

Strengthtening his math skills as he counts his creations and adds and subtracts them ;

Increaseing his understanding of certain science concepts as he conducts experiments like changing the Play-Doh’s texture by adding such things as water and sand.

 

The history of Play-Doh is certainly amazing. Who would ever think that  a wallpaper cleaner would be so entertaining and educational?  How has your child played with Play-Doh?


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BarbMolding the Amazing History of Play-Doh

Single-Parent Survival Guide – 6 Effective Strategies

BarbChild Development, Parenting

SIngle-Parent-Survival-Guide

 

 

Raising a child as a single parent can be challenging.  You are faced with handling many responsibilities and decisions yourself. How can you make life simpler and more enjoyable for you and your kids? Here is a Single-Parent Survival Guide which will give you six effective strategies to address those challenges.

Single-Parent Survival Guide

  1. Create a Routine

Maintaining a consistent schedule will structure your day and make your child feel more secure. Ensure that mealtimes, bedtimes, and awakening times are fairly regular.

  1. Include Play Time in Your Schedule

Carve out a time to relax and have fun with your kids no matter how hectic life gets. Tune out all distractions and concentrate on each other.

“I often recommend to families that they schedule a play time – perhaps-once a week- when they turn off the television and phone and spend a half hour playing a game, taking a walk, or throwing a ball around,” says Barry G. Ginsber, PHD, a child psychologist and family psychologist in Doylestown, Pa., and author of 50 Wonderful Ways to Be a Single-Parent Family. “It helps reinforce your emotional connection.”

  1. Ask for Help

Grow a support network of relatives, neighbors, and other parents from your child’s daycare center.  They can be a help with childcare, carpooling, as well as household projects.  You need people you can rely on in case of an emergency as well as a network of people you and your kids can interact with to participate in fun activities.

  1. Join a Childcare Co-Op

Consider joining a babysitting co-op to save money on babysitting and get to know other local families. Usually, a member of the co-op earns points for babysitting which she can exchange for babysitting services for her kids. Two co-op sites you may want to research are Sitting Around and Babysitting Exchange.

  1. Get Your Kids to Help

When you are a single parent, get your kids to feel like part of a team to help when needed. They might be able to unload the dishwasher, clean up after dinner, gather up the trash, or pick up toys and other items that are cluttering the house.

  1. Take Breaks

Arrange for your kids to spend time with their other parent, grandparents, or a babysitter so you can recharge your batteries.  Don’t spend the time cleaning.  Instead do something enjoyable.

 

Takeaway

We hope you‘ve found this Single-Parent Survival Guide helpful and will employ the strategies mentioned to make life easier for you and your children. Spending quality time as a family unit as well as private time for yourself are crucial to balancing the  challenges of being a single parent.


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

 

 

 

 

BarbSingle-Parent Survival Guide – 6 Effective Strategies

How to Foster Better Sleep Habits in Your Young Child

BarbChild Development, Children's Health

foster-better-sleep-habits-in-your-young-child

 

Why is it so important for your child to get a good night’s sleep? Good sleep habits help your child increase memory and attention skills, interact positively with others, and ready him to deal with new experiences

Researchers have concluded that poor sleep habits can lead to the possibility of obesity, diminished memory and attention, as well as poor academic performance in school-aged children. (Aronen, Paavonen, Fjallberg, Soinen, & Torronen, 2000; Buckhalt, El-Sheikh, & Keller, 2007; Meltzer & Mindell, 2009.)

Let’s review the correct amount of sleep for your child’s age and ways to foster better sleep habits in your young child.

Proper Amounts of Sleep for Your Young Child

In order for your child to have sufficient sleep, he should be getting the recommended number of hours listed below:

Sleep Duration

Age Group Years     Total Sleep
Infants 3-12 months 14-15 hours
Toddlers 1-3 years 12-14 hours
Preschoolers 3-5 years 11-13 hours
School-age 6-12 years 10-11 hours

Naps

For optimal daytime functioning, your child should be taking naps during the day. If your child skips a nap, try to keep him up until his next napping time so as not to throw off his sleep cycle.

Recommended Nap Times:

Age Number of Naps
By 4 months 3-4 per day
By 8 months 2 per day
By 21 months 1 per day
By 6- years’ old 0 per day

Quality of Sleep

If your child awakens too many times, he disrupts his natural sleep cycle and inhibits brain growth. If your child is more than 4- months’ old, his naps need to be at least one hour long to benefit his brain.

Strategies to Foster Better Sleep Habits in Your Young Child

Notice Drowsiness in Your Child

Recognize the signs of drowsiness in your child such as decreased activity level, drooping eyelids, yawning, and if his eyes are less focused. This is when your child’s nap or bed time should begin before he becomes overly tired. Overly-tired children have a difficult time falling asleep and may become cranky or irritable.

Develop Consistent Sleep and Wake-up Routines

Maintain your child’s internal clock by keeping his sleep schedule consistent. Select more calming activities right before his sleep times.  Reading or storytelling can pave the way for sleeping soundly as opposed to watching TV.

Don’t Leave Your Child’s Caretakers in the Dark

Make sure anyone who takes care of your child knows your child’s signs of drowsiness and your strategies for getting him to sleep. By keeping these lines of communication open, you’ll foster better better sleep habits in your child when you are not there.

 

Takeaway –

To foster better sleep habits in your child, be aware of the proper amount of sleep he should be getting for his age. Know when your child is growing tired and address his sleep needs then. Develop routine nap and bed times.  Children do better when they have set times for activities. Keep your child’s caretaker in the loop about his sleep habits so he gets the proper amount of sleep.


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

BarbHow to Foster Better Sleep Habits in Your Young Child

How to Get Better Cooperation from Your Preschooler at Home

BarbChild Development, Preschool Behavior

get-better-cooperation-from-your-Preschooler-at-home

 

Do you often wonder why your preschooler is so good in school but is a challenge to handle at home?

It’s partly because she tries to test your limits. Your little one knows that you will love her even when she’s bad. How can you get better cooperation from your preschooler at home?

Encourage Independence to Get Better Cooperation from Your Preschooler at Home

Although preschoolers still need some parental help, early childhood education experts confirm that young children are capable of doing much more than their parents think they can do.

Raise Your Expectations

Don’t accept that your preschoolers can’t put away their toys and clothes, or pour their own cereal. Get them involved in helping out as other members of the family do.

Resist the Urge to Help Her Do a Task

If she is  reluctant to do a task, ask, “Can you do this yourself or do you need my help?” Many times this helps them accept responsibility themselves.

Don’t Redo a Task Your Preschooler Has Completed

If your preschooler has made her bed and it’s not the way you would do it, don’t remake it. Praise your child and you’ll be encouraging her to make her bed every day rather than discouraging her. Kids have a tendency to repeat behaviors that get them attention and praise.

Don’t Rush in to Help Him Solve a Simple Problem

Give your preschooler an opportunity to put a toy together or get a book from a shelf, provided it’s safe to do so. Remember that as a parent, your goal is to raise a child who can eventually function independently as an adult. The more help you provide, the more he will expect.

Give Your Young Child a Household Chore

Making your child responsible for taking the clothes out of the dryer, or watering a few plants will strengthen her confidence to do more things herself.  She’ll want to help out as other family members do.

Develop Daily House Routines

Young children are more cooperative in school because they are taught a certain routine and once they learn it, they rarely have to be reminded to do it. Make it a rule about a time your preschooler has to take a bath, be in her pajamas, and then go to bed.  In the morning, try a routine which calls for getting dressed and washing hands before breakfast. After breakfast, get your child in the habit of brushing her teeth, gathering together items she needs for school that day, and putting on any needed outerwear before heading to school.

Give Her Advance Notice for Switching Gears

In school, the teacher tells the children that they must finish up on what they are doing because it’s time to go to lunch in five minutes. Doing this prevents any disappointment they may have because they have to immediately stop a project. At home, tell your child that she has until the next commercial starts to watch TV before getting ready to leave for school.

Don’t Speak in “If’s”

When asking your child to do something, don’t start off by saying, “If you put your toys away, you can go for ice cream.”  Rather say, “When you put your toys away, you can go for ice cream.” This is a much more affirmative way to notify your child that you expect her to put her toys away rather than assume she will do it.

Use Music

Music makes things fun.  Make up a clean-up song or play one of your child’s favorite songs while she is putting her toys away.

Let Your Preschooler Settle Minor Disagreements

Give your preschooler the opportunity to work things out with another child before interceding, unless they are physically fighting.  Your child needs to learn to settle disputes fairly and calmly because you won’t always be there to referee.

Takeaway

Implementing these ten suggestions will foster your child’s independence which will help you get better cooperation from your preschooler at home. She will know your expectations and be following routines and practices like she does in  preschool.

How have you increased cooperation from your preschooler at home?


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

BarbHow to Get Better Cooperation from Your Preschooler at Home

8 Awesome Reasons Why Early Child-Care Programs and Preschool Matter

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early-child-care-programs -and- preschool-matter

 

 

Does it seem like more kids are going to preschool and early child care these days than when you were in school?  Why are so many parents opting to start their child’s education sooner rather than later? Do early child-care programs and preschool matter that much?

Why Early Child Care Programs and Preschool Matter

1. Research shows that 90% of a child’s brain develops before age 5.

During this period of time, it’s important for your child to have experiences that shape his brain’s organizational development and function. In fact, children learn more quickly in their early years than in any other time in their lives.

2. Early child care programs and preschool address the specific ways that children develop and learn.

They arrange space, time, and activities to coordinate with children’s social, emotional, cognitive, and physical abilities.

3. Early child-care programs and preschool prepare your child for kindergarten and elementary school.

They offer the chance to share, follow instructions, and work in a structured group with teachers and other children.

4. Early child-care programs and preschool help your child develop socially and emotionally.

Teachers work with parents to ensure the same level of care in home and school. Children learn emotional self-control and how to interact with other children through their real-time experiences. They are encouraged to work out their differences and to be aware of how their hurtful behavior may affect another child’s feelings.

5. Early child-care programs and preschool help children learn to make good choices.

For example, when they can’t decide upon a play activity, the teacher encourages them to select something that interests them.

6. Early child-care programs and preschool help your child become more independent and help others.

A teacher may ask your child to help out in the classroom, assist another child who is learning a task that he has mastered, or to help acclimate a new child who is learning the class routines.  This fosters a sense of confidence in your child and increases his self-esteem.

7. Early child-care programs and preschools promote cognitive skills.

Through singing their “abc’s”, putting puzzles together, learning rhymes and new words, discussing read-aloud stories, doing basic counting and measuring activities, children are learning early literacy and math skills in interesting and meaningful ways.

8. Early child-care programs and preschool help your child develop motor skills.

Children’s physical coordination improves because they are involved in running, climbing, jumping, and playing active games. Activities such as bead-threading and scissor-cutting strengthen their fine motor skills as well as eye-hand coordination, too.

Takeaway

Early child-care programs and preschool matter in your child’s overall success because his brain is developing to 90% of its capacity during his first five years. To ensure your child’s overall success in school and life, it’s critical to address his learning needs during this time period when he learns more quickly than any other time in his life.

If you now see why early child-care programs and preschool matter but are curious to visit in person, contact Chappell Schools at 904.739.1279 for your own personal tour.  We have eight campuses throughout Jacksonville and would be happy to schedule your visit.


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

Barb8 Awesome Reasons Why Early Child-Care Programs and Preschool Matter