Successful Kids’ Nutrition Tips and Tricks to Make Your Life Easier

BarbChildren's Health

Kids-nutrition-tips-and-tricks

 

Did you know that March is National Nutrition Month? We know how hard you try to ensure that your children eat well and how challenging that can be. During the month of March, we will be addressing healthy eating habits with your children through stories and activities. By making them more aware of how important it is to eat nutritiously and providing you with these kids’ nutrition tips, we hope to make your life easier.

Make Healthy Foods Available to Your Child

To prevent your child from making wrong choices, stock your refrigerator, freezer, or pantry with these foods:

Purchase your child’s favorite type of fruit, wash it, cut it up, and store it in a clear container in your refrigerator so your child can easily access it when looking for a quick snack.

Likewise, wash and chop up fresh veggies like broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, and snow peas for salads or for your child to eat out of a small container.

Keep hummus on hand and mix veggies like carrots, or celery, into it.

Plain or vanilla low-fat yogurt – mix fresh fruit and a bit of honey for a sweet treat.

Keep whole grain crackers containing 2 grams of fiber stocked for quick treats.

Unsweetened applesauce can be eaten alone or mixed into yogurt or cottage cheese.

Switch out regular potatoes for sweet potatoes so your child gets more Vitamin A.

Buy whole-grain breakfast cereal with at least 3 grams of fiber.

Peanut butter or other nut butters add protein to celery, crackers, or bananas.

Include light tuna or salmon in sandwiches and salads for an additional source of protein and Omega-3’s (salmon)

Cooked boneless chicken breasts can be added to pasta, salads, and stir fry.

90% lean, ground beef can be a source of protein and eaten with pasta or beans and cheese in casseroles.

Keep 2% low-fat cheese blocks and strings to add more calcium to your child’s diet.

Use tortillas instead of bread for a fun way to eat sandwiches.

Veggie burgers present another source of protein from soy.

Dilute 100% fruit juice with water or seltzer to reduce the sugar content.

Kids’ Nutrition Tips and Tricks

Implementing the following behaviors will facilitate better eating habits in your child:

Be an example and eat healthy snacks like a piece of fruit instead of a candy bar.

If your child wants a candy bar, dip a strawberry into some chocolate sauce.

Don’t nag your child about eating unhealthy foods.  Praise him when he makes healthy eating choices.

Eat dinner as a family as research shows that kids who eat dinner as a family at the table have better nutrition.

Turn of the TV while eating so your child isn’t tempted to eat sugary foods advertised on television.

Dish out the portions in the kitchen and bring to the dining table rather than allow your child to get his own servings.

Serve small portions so your child can ask for more if he wants more.

Serve a variety of brightly-colored foods.  A platter of mashed sweet potatoes, broccoli, and chicken will look appealing to eat.

Serve main meals and snacks at the same time every day. Children do better when they know what to expect.

For something different, serve healthy breakfast foods for dinner. Scrambled eggs; oatmeal; or high-fiber, low-sugar cereals can add variety.

Serve juice or milk with the main meals and water throughout the day so your young child doesn’t fill up too much during the day.

Connect healthy foods to things your child likes to do such as sports, games, and excelling in school. “Eating your green beans will help strengthen your body so you do well at baseball.”

To encourage your child to try new foods, talk about the food’s color, shape, smell, and texture, rather than its taste.

Give your child some choice in what he eats.  Determine what his favorite foods are and serve more of these while gradually introducing him to new foods.

We hope you find these kids’ nutrition tips and tricks helpful in getting your child to eat healthy. Do you have a nutrition tip, favorite, healthy food or recipe to share? Leave a comment and let us know.


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

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Fine Dining Practices Your Preschooler Should Know

BarbParenting

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Little Albert’s parents sat patiently at the dining table in the restaurant hoping their meals would soon arrive. They felt like they were waiting for a volcano to erupt because they didn’t know how much longer their three-year-old would sit still. Finally, after a wait of ten minutes, their waiter arrived with their order. By this time, Albert was hungry and ornery. He picked up the saucy strands of spaghetti with his hands and started feeding himself. Needless to say, he got spaghetti sauce all over his clothes, hands, and face.  He was quite a sight as he chewed on his pasta with his mouth wide-open. After a few bites, he demanded to leave the restaurant;hejust couldn’t sit still.

Do you dread taking your little one out to eat because he acts like little Albert every time?  How can you enjoy time in a restaurant with your family without having to endure an embarrassing situation that reflects poorly on you, the parents?

At Chappell Schools, we work on fine dining skills with your children because they will need them to socialize properly with others throughout their lives. They also make your children more pleasant dining companions. We suggest you reinforce these table manners by practicing them with your child at home and when dining in a restaurant. By doing this, you will be helping to lay the groundwork now.

11 Dining Practices Your Preschooler Should Know

1. Always come to the dinner table with a clean face and hands to show respect to the person who prepared the meal and others sitting at the table. Make this a good hygiene habit.

2.Once everyone is seated at the table, unfold your napkin and place it on your lap. Use the napkin to remove any food on your hands and mouth throughout the meal.

3.Don’t begin eating until everyone is seated.

4.If you need to use the restroom in the middle of the meal, excuse yourself, and place your napkin on the seat of your chair not back on the table.

5.Take small bites of food and chew slowly with your mouth closed.

6.Don’t interrupt while others are speaking. Wait until there is a break in conversation.

7.Say “please” and “thank you” when requesting and receiving something.

8.Don’t reach for items across the table. Politely, ask someone near the item you need to pass it to you.  Don’t say, “I want more potatoes.” Instead say, “Please pass the potatoes.”

9.Sit at the table for 15 to 30minutes without wiggling around or wandering.

10.When dining in a restaurant , look directly at the waiter and clearly order what you would like to eat.

11.When leaving the table, push the chair back under the table.

These are all dining practices your preschooler (aged 3-5) should know. Be patient with your children because it will take them time to make these dining practices good habits. Continue to give them reminders like a certain gesture to remind them that they are forgetting their dining manners.  Read entertaining stories about dining manners to them that will help get your point across.  Praise your children when they have mastered these dining practices.  Let them know that when they show respect for others, they will get great things in return.

“I just wanted to say that we were extremely impressed and thoroughly enjoyed the VPK Fine Dining Extravaganza. Thank you so much for your time and energy that went into making the event special and memorable for the students and parents. My son (Willie) as well as the other students were so proud and majestic in their presentation, you could just see the honor they felt and enjoyed.
As a parent I applaud the efforts of you and the school to look at the whole child and provide experiences that not only lend to academic success but to increase social skills and knowledge.
Again, kudos to you and the entire staff for a job well done!!”
~Crystalene, FSCJ Downtown Campus Parent

Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

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Kids’ Answers to “What Does Love Mean?”

BarbLove, Uncategorized

 

 

what-does-love-meanFor Valentine’s Day , we thought we’d share some children’s responses to the question, “What does love mean?” We think you’ll agree that their answers are examples of wonderful wisdom from the mouths of babes !

What Does Love Mean?

“When my grandma got arthritis, she couldn’t bend over and paint her toenails anymore. So my grandpa does it for her all the time, even when his hands got arthritis too. That’s love.” (Rebecca – age 8)

“When someone loves you, the way they say your name is different. You just know that your name is safe in their mouth.”  (Billy – age 7)

“Love is when a girl puts on perfume and a boy puts on shaving cologne and they go out and smell each other.” (Karl – age 5)

“Love is sharing even if you think you don’t have enough.” (Chrissie – age 6)

“Love is like medicine, and hate is like poison. If everybody knew that, we’d all be happy.” (Keisha – age 8)

“You can hear love in someone’s voice…the sound of kindness is as loving as it gets.”  (Emmanuel – Age 9 – who is blind from birth)

“Love is what makes you smile when you’re too tired to think.” (Terri – age 9)

 

“Love is when my mommy makes coffee for my daddy and she takes a sip before giving it to him, to make sure the taste is OK.” (Danny – age 7)

“Love is the quiet sound in the room when the people you care about are all together.” (Luis – age 10)

“When you love somebody, it doesn’t matter if they’re gone for a little while or forever. You still find a way to love them.” (Karen – age 7)

“My mommy said they adopted me because they wanted one more way to grow love in our family.  She said I grew in her heart, not in her belly.” (Hector – age 9)

“Love is when you tell a boy you like his shirt, and then he wears it everyday.” (Noelle – age 7)

“Love is like a little old woman and a little old man who are still friends even after they know each other much too well.” (Tommy – age 8)

“During my piano recital, I was on a stage and I was scared. I looked at all the people watching me and I saw my daddy waving and smiling. I wasn’t scared anymore. Love does that.” (Cindy – age 8)

“My mommy loves me more than anybody. You don’t see anyone else kissing me to sleep at night, do you?” (LaShonda – age 6)

“Love is when Daddy looks at me and calls me his little flower that’s always in bloom. You get the picture.” (Elaine – age 9)

 

 “Love is when Mommy sees a picture of my family on the wall and stops to take a little extra long look at it.” (Chris – age 7)

“Love is when your puppy licks your face even after you left him alone all day.” (Mary Ann – age 6)

“You really shouldn’t say ‘I love you’ unless you mean it. But if you mean it, you should say it a lot. People might forget.” (Jessica – age 9)

 

This Valentine’s Day, we hope you see love in the simple things in life these children do.

Happy Valentine’s Day,

Chappell Schools 


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

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10 Wise Ways to Make the “Terrible Two’s” Tolerable

BarbParenting, Toddler Behavior

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Two-year-old Tommy squirmed anxiously in his seat in the grocery cart.  “I want up!” he cried to his mother.

Tommy’s mom looked inside her purse and found a box of raisins to give little Tommy in hopes that he would settle down.  She had just started her weekly grocery shopping and didn’t want to have to return home.

Tommy munched on a few raisins and then asked his mom to lift him out of the cart again. When she declined, Tommy angrily threw the remaining raisins onto the store floor and started wailing loudly. Quickly, Tommy’s mom complied and took Tommy outside to their car. Another trip to the grocery store was a disaster. What could she do to cope with her little one’s persistent temper tantrums? Here are ten ways to make the “terrible two’s” tolerable:

Ways to Make the “Terrible Two’s” Tolerable

1. Be prepared.

The “terrible two’s” are a developmental stage toddlers usually go through anywhere from 18 to 30 months and can last into age three. Educate yourself by reading some books that can give you some insight on what to expect and how to handle it.  A book entitled How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk  might be a good start.

2. Let them make choices.

When children are in the “terrible two’s” stage of development, they are trying to assert their independence, and explore the world. They are not trying purposely to make their parents mad. Give your child choices between two things you are OK with them doing. “Do you want to eat dinner or go outside,” may not afford you the response you want when you are trying to get your child to eat dinner. “Would you like to play inside with your Legos or play outside in your sandbox?” allows your child to select an outcome that will give him some exercise which is what you want him to get.

3. Allow your child to help.

Children at this age love to imitate and help. Although it may be easier for you to put away groceries or laundry, let your child help to build a sense of independence and learn a new task.

4. Give fair warning when it’s time to transition to another activity.

Don’t expect your child to agree to leave the playground when he is really enjoying himself. Allow about 10 minutes. Give him time to transition by saying, “You may go down the sliding board two more times and then we must leave.” Show him two fingers and count with him each time he goes down the slide.

5. Pick your battles.

If you are having a day when your toddler is really “pushing your buttons”, you ‘ll need to ignore small things for the time being. For example, if there is a certain way you expect your child to eat with a fork and he isn’t doing it that day, let it go. On a particularly trying day, it can keep you sane instead of frustrated. Continue to reinforce the eating-with-fork behavior you want him to adopt on another less trying day.

6. Use distractions.

When your child starts to ask for an ice cream cone right before lunch at the zoo, try saying, “Look, Johnny, see that tall giraffe? Let’s go see what he’s doing before we miss it.”

7. Be positive.

Research shows that children remember positive statements more so than negative ones.  Instead of saying, “No hitting,” say, “We use our hands to help others not hurt them.”

8. Manage those temper tantrums.

If your child acts up in a public place like little Tommy did, remain calm. Try saying, “I know you are upset but let’s pick out some bananas for your breakfast tomorrow. You‘ll be able to pick them out better sitting in the cart.”

If he still doesn’t calm down and insists on getting out of the shopping cart, for example, take him out of the store to a private area. Talk to him face-to- face and say, “You‘re out of control. I am here to help you. You can’t get out of the cart in the grocery store because people may walk into you and you may fall hurting yourself. Mommy doesn’t want to see you get hurt. Until you calm down, you are going to sit here.”

Continue to offer him understanding and eventually he should settle down. If it will inconvenience you to take him home, return to the store once your child is calm and place him back into the shopping cart.

9. Ensure your child gets enough sleep.

Tiredness can make a child cranky. Try to maintain your child’s regular nap times during the day. If your child no longer naps, then make sure he is getting the proper amount of sleep each evening by getting to bed at a consistent time every night.

10. Get together with other moms.

If possible, don’t go it alone.  Meet other moms with young children through your church, preschool, neighborhood or meetup.com You can share helpful ways to make the “terrible two’s” tolerable.

How have you managed to survive the “terrible two’s”?

 


 

Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

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Digesting the True Effects of Sugar on Your Child

BarbChildren's Health

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Do you dread when your child gets an invitation to another child’s birthday party because you know she’ll be eating lots of candy and bouncing off the walls? Is sugar the real culprit here? What are the true effects of sugar on your child?

What the Experts Say About Sugar and Hyperactivity in Children

Believe it or not, there is no scientific evidence that sugar makes kids hyperactive. In fact, a few drops of sugar water in a baby’s bottle can help soothe his crying. That’s because when sugar enters the bloodstream and reaches the brain, it temporarily increases calming neurochemicals such as serotonin.

Both pediatricians and nutritionists confirm that sugar in moderate amounts can be healthy in a child’s diet. The problem occurs when children eat too much too often. Sugar-rich foods can provide empty calories and cause children to become full. Thus, they skip the nutritious foods they should have. Furthermore, when kids eat highly-sugared foods, it can cause them to crave more sweets.

Although there is no exact amount of sugar all children should have, these health concerns can help guide you in your allotment of sugar to your child.

Uncovering the True Effects of Sugar on Your Child

1. Cavities

Although sugar doesn’t cause the cavities, it can increase the growth of bacteria in your child’s mouth which does. Due to this, dentists discourage putting babies to sleep with a bottle of milk (contains milk sugars) or fruit juice or allowing them to sip them throughout the day.

2. Behavior Problems

When your child consumes a large amount of sugar at a birthday party, her blood sugar rises too high. Her body then produces a surge of insulin, a hormone that removes sugar from her blood and disperses it into her body cells. This can cause her blood -sugar levels to drop suddenly making your child feel shaky and sluggish.  Low blood sugar can increase cravings for more sugar, too.

You can control any post-sugar meltdown your child may have by monitoring the amount of sugar she has at any one time. Control the portion of candy or cake your child eats; add some water to dilute heavily-sugared fruit juices and punches; and, select sweets low in sugar. Include protein such as cheese, soy, meat, beans, or fiber such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains with the sweet treat. By doing this, you can aid in reducing the rise and fall of your child’s blood sugar.

3. Obesity

Eating sweets doesn’t automatically make kids overweight. However, when kids consume too much high-calorie desserts, beverages, and snacks they consume more than their normal caloric intake increasing their chances of becoming overweight.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends the following limits on consumption of sugared fruit juices:

No fruit juice for babies under 6-months old

No more than 6 ounces a day for babies 6-months to 1-year old

No more than 6 ounces a day for kids 1-6- years old

No more than 12 ounces a day for kids over 6-years old

4.Diabetes

A diet high in sugar can increase your child’s risk of developing Type 2 diabetes or the prediabetic condition, insulin resistance syndrome. These two health conditions occur when the body becomes less sensitive to insulin which regulates blood sugar. Both can increase the likelihood of serious health issues later in life such as heart disease and even infertility.

Takeaway

Most kids can partake of occasional sweets without a problem. In fact, pediatric endocrinologist, David Geller, M.D. of Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, recommends, “Desserts and candy can be once-in-a-while treats. Once a week is a good goal. The body only cares what you do to it most of the time.”

In small doses, sugar can even help kids eat more nutritiously. Adding a teaspoon of sugar to a whole-grain cereal like oatmeal or wheat bran can help kids like it more without affecting their blood-sugar levels. Remember the old adage,” A spoon full of sugar makes the medicine go down?” As with everything, moderation is the key.


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

 

 

 

 

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How to Influence a Healthy Bond Between Grandparents and Grandkids 

BarbChild Development, Parenting

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Have you had another unpleasant experience with your children’s grandparents?  Are they spoiling your kids too much by giving them everything they want? Are your kids behavior problems when they arrive home after a visit with their grandparents?  Let’s examine some ways you can influence a healthy bond between grandparents and grandkids.

Why Grandkids Need Their Grandparents

Grandparents serve as companions and confidants at times. They can provide emotional support when a family is experiencing tough times such as a divorce, death in the family, or other family hardships. They can provide child care services when parents aren’t available. Grandparents pass on the family history and traditions by sharing information about you, your relatives, and family customs that you may have not shared with your kids. They serve as role models about aging.  How kids see their grandparents age may affect how they view aging. As Rudy Giuliani summed it up:

“What children need most are the essentials that grandparents provide in abundance. They give unconditional love, kindness, patience, humor, comfort, lessons in life. And, most importantly, cookies.”

Ways to Influence a Healthy Bond Between Grandparents and Grandkids

How to Manage Over-Indulgent Grandparents

It’s natural for grandparents to want to spoil their grandkids. They want to shower them with all the things they may not have been able to give you as a child. They want to be loved by their grandkids. As a parent, you ‘ll need to tolerate a bit of spoiling and appreciate that your parents are the loving, caring people they are. However, if you feel that they are going overboard with gifts or permitting them to do certain things you do not allow in your home, you will need to address the problem with them.

Let your parents know what things or experiences you don’t want your children to have and the reasons. “Please don’t bring Susie for ice cream right before you drop her home for dinner.  She isn’t hungry for her supper after she eats it.” “I know David has been asking you for a laptop but he doesn’t need one, yet.  He can use ours.” “Kim needs to go to bed at 8pm. If she stays up past that, it throws off her sleep patterns and I have a difficult time getting her up for school on Monday.”

How Can You Help Your Kids’ Grandparents Spend Quality Time with Your Kids?

If your kids are bored when they go to their grandparent’s house or your parents want some ideas on what to do with your child, offer some suggestions such as:

Make cookies together.

Show them family photos and talk about the people in the pictures.

Teach them how to do something like painting, gardening, or playing a new game.

Go for walks and feed the ducks.

Take them to the zoo.

Play their favorite board games or puzzles.

Watch a fun movie together.

Read them their favorite books

Be positive. Let your parents know if there was an activity your kids enjoyed doing with them.

What You Shouldn’t Do

Don’t compare how other family members interact with your child.  It will only cause resentment.

Don’t show partiality to one set of grandparents. Make sure they have equal opportunities to interact with their grandkids.

Don’t be unrealistic about how you want your parents to interact with your kids. Nobody is perfect! You don’t want grandparents walking on eggshells when spending time with your child. It won’t be an enjoyable experience for them or your kids.

Don’t criticize grandparents when your kids are present.

Try implementing some of our suggestions to influence a healthy bond between grandparents and grandkids.  How have you tried to strengthen the relationship between your parents and your kids?

“Remember a grandparent is a little bit parent, a little bit teacher, and a little bit best friend.” What more could a kid ask for?

~ Unknown


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

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Don’t Make Your Child’s Move from Crib to Bed a Nightmare

BarbToddler Behavior

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As a parent of a toddler, you ‘re probably wondering when is the right time for your child’s move from crib to bed? After all, you want this to be a permanent transition so you can remove the crib from the room as soon as possible.

Believe it or not, the average time for a child’s move from crib to bed is between three- to- four-years old. If doing it before then, you run the risk of losing sleep over a cranky child who is not ready for the change.  Your child will need to understand that she must stay in her bed. If she doesn’t have that impulse control, a bed won’t work.

Reasons Not to Make Your Child’s Move from Crib to Bed

  1. You will be removing the confines of the crib bars. Your child may start leaving her bed in the middle of the night and waking you so she can sleep in your bed.
  2. Your little one is doing fine in her crib. It provides enough room for her to sleep comfortably.
  3. Your child has not developed a regular sleep routine.
  4. You are in the middle of potty-training which is enough of a change for your toddler at one time.
  5. You are moving to a new home – too much change at one time.

Reasons It’s Time to Make Your Child’s Move from Crib to Bed

  1. Your child is past two-years-old and the crib is becoming more of a safety issue. You don’t want your child climbing out of her crib and risk a dangerous fall.
  2. Your child is over two-years-old and you are expecting another baby and need the crib. If your child is younger, you may need two cribs in the room for awhile.
  3. Your three-year-old is too big for her crib preventing her from getting a comfortable night’s rest.

Get the Right Bed to Make Your Child’s Move from Crib to Bed Successful

You might consider transitioning your child to a toddler bed rather than a twin-sized bed if she is smaller. She will feel much more comfortable in a bed of this size. However, if your child is too big for a crib, it’s wise to get a twin-sized bed.

 

How to Make Your Child’s Move from Crib to Bed Successful

  1. Toddler-proof your child’s bedroom. Remember she will have free access to everything in her room once she is no longer behind the crib bars. You don’t want her tripping during the night, playing with electrical cords, or pulling a light-weight dresser on top of her.
  2. Prepare your toddler for the change by talking about it. Let her know what’s going to happen and when. Remember that toddlers prefer routine and predictability. You will need to ease her into the transition. Talk about sleeping in a bed as something big girls do.  Read a book about it.
  3. Dress her big bed to look welcoming and comfortable. Let her help you shop for kid’s bed linens. Include some of your toddler’s favorite stuffed animals on the bed.
  4. Leave the crib in the room for a few weeks if your toddler is having trouble adjusting. She will have choices rather than be forced into a larger bed with no say in the matter. By doing this, your young child will feel that she has more control over the switch and will adapt better.
  5. Be prepared for nightly visits. Be firm and take your child back to his bed without showing any emotion. If she starts crying you will need to ignore it. After awhile, your toddler will stop leaving her bed when she sees that her crying isn’t getting her anything.
  6. Realize that this change won’t happen overnight. Be patient, consistent and firm and soon everyone in your home will be dreaming happily.

 

How did you make your child’s move from crib to bed a dream come true rather than a nightmare?


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

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6 Child-Anxiety-Provoking Taboos You Should Break

BarbChild Development, Parenting

child-anxiety-provoking-taboos

 

 

Are you unknowingly exacerbating your child’s anxiety? Sometimes it’s hard to mask a worry and your child will pick up on it. However, there are  ways to prevent your fears from affecting your child. Focus on eliminating  these 6 child-anxiety-provoking taboos.

Say Goodbye to These 6 Child-Anxiety-Provoking Taboos

 

1. Getting Upset About a Problem

Don’t fall apart over problems you are experiencing at home or work in front of your children. Kids need to know that everything doesn’t always go as planned. Don’t shield them from stressful situations. Show them healthy ways of problem-solving instead of falling apart over matters that are troubling you.

2. Asking Negative-based Questions

If you are nervous about how your child will do in a game or competition, don’t ask, “Are you nervous about Saturday’s game?”  Ask a more neutral question like, “How are you feeling about your game on Saturday?”  Let your child’s emotions lead the conversation.  If you exude a calm, and confident manner, it will transfer to your child.

3. Not Scheduling Any Relaxing Down-Time Together

Show your child that relaxing can be a healthy stress-buster. Spend some quality time with your child watching a movie, reading his favorite book, engaging in silly play, spending some relaxing time on the beach, or taking a walk in a park.

4. Forgetting to Reward Your Child’s Brave Behaviors

When your child faces his fears, reward him with praise or a hug, or even something like a sticker or small treat. Rewarding positive behaviors will encourage your child to repeat them.

5. Negating Your Child’s Fears and Anxieties

If your child expresses anxiety about a situation, don’t “pooh pooh” it. Acknowledge that you can tell he is afraid and discuss why he is feeling that way and what he can do to allay his fears. Practice some relaxation techniques like deep, slow breathing exercises or help him imagine he is on a calm beach listening to the waves and the seagulls.

6. Not Encouraging Good Sleep Habits

As we’ve stressed in past posts, it’s important for your child’s overall health  to have a steady sleep schedule even on the weekends.  Establish  a regular routine that helps transition your child from the activities of the day to a more relaxed mood so he can fall asleep.  Reading aloud to your child will not only get him in a calmer mood but will also foster his language development skills.

Takeaway –

It’s important for your child to know that natural anxiety is a part of life and that there are healthy ways to cope with it. Remember that your child will mimic your problem-solving behavior. Eliminating these 6 child-anxiety-provoking taboos will pave the way for your child to handle anxiety and stress so it doesn’t negatively impact his lifestyle.


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

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20 No-nonsense Signs Your Young Child May Be Speech-Delayed

BarbBaby Behavior, Child Development, Preschool Behavior, Toddler Behavior

signs-your-child-may-be-speech-delayed

 

Sandy never thought much about her three-year- old son’s inability to say much until her mother and mother-in-law started incessantly nagging her about it.

“Are you sure there is nothing wrong with Sam?  He should be speaking a lot more words and phrases than he does,“ opined Sandy’s mother.

“I can’t believe that Sam is only using hand signals to indicate what he wants.  Have you mentioned this to his pediatrician?” Sandy’s mother-in -law inquired.

“Mom, did you know that Albert Einstein didn’t speak until he was 4-years’ old. Sometimes gifted children are speech -delayed,” replied Sandy.

Frustrated by her family’s concerns, Sandy headed off to her local library one day to arm herself with some information about delayed-speech in young children. She’d settle the matter once and for all.  There wasn’t anything wrong with her precious Sam.

As Sandy anxiously searched though the pile of books she had selected on the topic, here is what she learned:

What defines a young child as “speech-delayed”?

If your 18-month-old to 30-month-old toddler has a good understanding of language and is developing play, motor, thinking, and social skills but doesn’t speak many words, he may be speech- delayed. These children have the foundation for speaking but don’t talk or talk very infrequently.

Are there common characteristics of speech-delayed children?

Research has indicated some commonalities of speech-delayed children:

  1. Late talkers are more prone to have a family history of delayed speech.
  2. Speech -delayed children tend to be male.
  3. Children who don’t talk at an early age either have been born at less than 85% of their optimal birth weight or at less than 37 weeks’ gestation. [1]
  4. Approximately 13% of two-year olds are late talkers. [2]

Although children learn language at different rates, most follow a general timeline. It’s important to recognize any unusual problems as early as possible as it is easier to correct speech-delays when caught at an early stage.

Signs Your Child May Be Speech-Delayed

At 12-months’ old

Cannot say “mama” or “dada”

Does not use gestures such as waving, shaking head, or pointing to communicate

At 15-months’ old

Does not utter single words

Does not babble as if he were talking

At 18-months’ old

Doesn’t speak at least 6 words

Can’t point to a specific body part upon being asked where it is

Doesn’t point to what she wants

At 19-20-months’ old

Isn’t learning about one  new word per week

At 24-months’ old

Does not know the purpose of common household items such as toothbrush, fork, plate

Cannot combine two words

At 25-months’ old

Can’t name a few body parts

Does not ask simple questions

Can’t complete simple, familiar nursery rhymes

At 30-months’ old

No one in the family can understand the child

At age 3-years’ old

Does not want to play with other children

Doesn’t use common pronouns like “you “, “I”

Cannot speak in short phrases

At age 4-years’ old

Is unable to pronounce most single consonants

Doesn’t comprehend similarities and differences

Doesn’t use pronouns like “me” and “you “correctly

When Sandy looked at the signs of delayed speech in all the books she researched, she was convinced that perhaps she should take Sam to her pediatrician to get his opinion which would end her mom’s and mother-in-law’s persistent inquiries about the child’s speaking patterns.

Takeaway:

How to Help Your Speech-Delayed Child

It’s important to realize that most kids will improve their speech patterns with some encouragement, more social interaction, and speech therapy. If you notice any of the 20 signs your young child may be speech-delayed, schedule an appointment with your pediatrician to ensure there is no hearing problem. Your pediatrician can refer you to speech-therapy programs within your community.  Remember – the earlier you identify and address whether your child has a speech-delayed problem, the easier it will be for him to overcome it.

References:

  1. Ellis, E. & Thal, D. (2008). Early Language Delay and Risk for Language Impairment. Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, 15: 93-100.
  2. Telethon Institute for Child Health Research (2008, May 16). Mixed Results For Late-talking Toddlers. Science Daily. 16 May 2008. Web. 10 Jun. 2011.

Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

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 Improve Your Family’s Lifestyle with These New Year’s Resolutions

BarbParenting, Preschool Behavior, Stress-Relievers, Toddler Behavior

improve-your-family's-lifestyle

 

 

As 2016 ends, are you busy thinking about making some 2017 resolutions to improve your family’s lifestyle?  Do you want less chaos and disagreements in your home? Want a better work/life balance so you can spend more quality time with your family? As the parent of preschoolers, here are a few you might consider:

Resolve to Improve Your Family’s Lifestyle

  1. Focus more on your child’s positive behaviors instead of the negative ones.

When you see your child doing something good, compliment him. This will build up his self-esteem and encourage him to continue doing things he knows you want him to do.

  1. Carve out more quality time to spend as a family.

The hustle and bustle of family life coupled with your work life can sometimes mean less time together eating meals, playing a family game, or reading to your children. Resolve that in 2017, you will have at least two shared family mealtimes a week and a weekend a month strictly for family activities together. Doing these things will strengthen your family bond and help you all get along better.

  1. Do not get involved in your children’s fights.

Let them work things out as much as possible on their own. They ‘ll learn how to resolve conflicts and realize that you aren’t going to always be the referee.  If possible, leave the room when they start to argue and let them settle their dispute.

  1. Identify your most challenging times of the day.

Is it getting ready and out the door in the morning, or mealtime chaos, or bedtime battles with your kids? Create a plan to survive those stressful times.  Get organized so things run more smoothly at these difficult times of the day. If your kids are slow to get ready in the morning, get them up a little earlier and have their clothes ready to dress them the night before.  Schedule what each night’s meal will be over the weekend and make sure you have the ingredients available. During the week, simplify cooking as much as possible. Perhaps one night a week could be take-out – a pizza and a salad – no cooking and very little clean -up involved.

  1. Make sure that you include some time to yourself each week.

Hire a sitter or solicit the help of your relatives so you and your partner can go out to dinner one night.  Change your household routine. Designate certain times for cleaning, doing laundry, grocery shopping, etc. Schedule some time where you can just “chill out”.

  1. Don’t give into your child’s temper tantrums.

When your child throws a temper tantrum, he is trying to blackmail you to give into his demands.  If you are at home when this happens, leave the room. Ignore his ranting and raving and he’ll soon realize that this behavior won’t affect your decision.

Takeaway

Be realistic and choose one or two of these new year’s resolutions to improve your family’s lifestyle.  Nobody said parenting was easy.  In fact, it’s probably the hardest job. Is there a resolution you are going to make to improve your family’s lifestyle that’s not on this list?


Chappell Schools of Jacksonville, Florida has been providing child care and preschool learning programs for 55+ years. Our educational programs address the TOTAL child – cognitively, emotionally, physically, and socially. We pride ourselves on being voted one of the “Top 50 For-Profit Child Care Organizations in North America.”  Visit one of our eight centers to see how we make learning fun by contacting us at 904.739.1279.  To get  more child care tips, please “Like” our Facebook page. 

 

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